Tech Talk: Ryan Hanna, Ph.D. Student at UC San Diego

Energy dispatch schedule optimization for demand charge reduction using a photovoltaic-battery storage system with solar forecasting
December 11, 2013 6:00pm to 8:00pm
San Diego Supercomputer Center - E145
Abstract: 

Energy storage is critical to the large-scale integration of wind and solar energy on the electric grid. Numerous grid applications for storage exist, such as demand charge management (DCM), in which storage is discharged when demand for power is high and charged when demand is low to mitigate and shift in the time the peak load (termed peak load shifting), thereby reducing a customer’s demand charge utility bill.

Simple DCM schemes exist but are not optimal. In this work we seek to optimize the load reduction potential of an energy storage system coupled with a photovoltaic array using solar irradiance and building load forecasts (metered in real-time from a power meter at the SDSC). The problem is formulated as a linear optimization (linear program) considering day-ahead estimates for irradiance and load. Typical discharge behavior of the energy storage system will be presented and contrasted against days when the system performed sub-optimally. Focus will be given to the optimization method and predictive forecasting techniques.

Speaker Bio(s): 

Ryan Hanna is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE Department) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).  He holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis (2011).  His research interests include grid integration of solar energy and his current work includes the study and programming of energy storage dispatch schedules for combined photovoltaic-battery storage systems to mitigate peak load demand for demand charge management.  He works under the guidance of Dr. Jan Kleissl.

Jan Kleissl is an Associate Professor in the MAE Department at UCSD, and Associate Director of the Center for Energy Research.  Kleissl received a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University in Environmental Engineering and joined UCSD in 2006.  Kleissl supervises 16 PhD students who work on solar power forecasting and solar grid integration work funded by CPUC, CEC, NREL, and DOE.  Kleissl teaches classes in Renewable Energy Meteorology, Fluid Mechanics, and Laboratory Techniques.  Kleissl received the 2009 National Science Foundation CAREER award and the 2008 UCSD Sustainability award.